Poem For The Sunday Lectionary (Epiphany 3, Yr B)

MENDING THEIR NETS
(Mark 1: 14-20)

It is a day that could be like any other.

The water is calm in the morning light
as the gulls thread the air with their singing.

The sun is warm on the backs of their necks
as the fishermen bend to their mending.

The blunted points of their wooden needles
float in, float out of the webbing –

create a loop, pinch with finger and thumb,
thread the needle through and then around again,

tighten the knot, pick up the next mesh –
callused hands repeating the operation

that has been handed down, fathers to sons,
from generation to generation.

The net’s hole rapidly closes. Conversation
weaves in, weaves out while they’re working,

returning often to talk of a preacher
whose words have set their hopes rising,

the hopes handed down like the knowledge
in their hands, woven into the fabric of living.

The wind is warm on the cheeks of his face
as the preacher comes near with his message.

The world is torn, there is brokenness of heart,
there are wounds everywhere in creation.

But the preacher has news, good news of change:
that God’s healing love is accessible,

and he knows this good news can mend the torn world,
can be threaded into every heart’s beating.

Now the preacher is calling them, calling their names,
calling them to take up new labour,

calling them to see, with the vision of hope,
people gathered in newness of community,

one they will help build, like a great catch of fish,
abundant with fresh possibility.

The water is calm in the morning light
and the gulls continue their singing.

The sun is warm on the backs of their necks
as the fishermen join Christ in his mending.

It is a day that is not – and yet could be – like any other . . .

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2 thoughts on “Poem For The Sunday Lectionary (Epiphany 3, Yr B)

  1. thank you for this. I am going to share in a Senior’s Care Home setting for worship this week.

  2. Rev. Empy says:

    Lovely. May share it with the congregation as part of this Sunday’s sermon. Thank you.

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